blog by

rob kircher


Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Now and Then – August 28th 1963 and 2010

It’s always cool when you shoot a photograph, take a look at it, and realize it reminds  you of an image you’ve seen in news and print all your life especially if that photograph is of a monumental event in your history. 

Below are two photographs I took at the Restoring Honor Rally this past Saturday.

20100828 Restoring Honor-0038-021

20100828 Restoring Honor-0037-020

I shot my images on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial 47 years to the day that the images bellow were shot from similar locations.

march_on_washington

march_on_washington_edit

Of course, the black and white photos were shot August 28, 1963 during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.  This was at the height of the Civil Rights movement, where over 250,000 people, mostly of African American decent, marched from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial culminating with Marin Luther Kings I have a Dream speech.   Unfortunately, for the movement, African Americans and the country as a whole, King was assassinated 5 years later in Memphis, Tennessee.  I shutter to think how things may have been different had he lived to see his dream to fruition.  

For those of us who lived through and were born in the 60s, these images are engrained in our memories, seeing them on TV and in news papers, magazines and now history books. It makes it specialty gratifying when you have an opportunity to photograph something similar, on the same day, 47 years later, that arguably may also have historical importance.  Of course only time will tell but there is no arguing the historical importance of the 1963 photos. 

Please note: I make no direct comparison between the Restoring Honor Rally and the March on Washington.  I’m merely pointing out the satisfaction in producing similar photographs 47 years after the originals.   



1 comment:

  1. This is a fabulous prospective - love it. We are so lucky to have photo's to clearly show history, such as Mathew Brady and the civil war. Made that war real in our minds and hearts- even 150 years later.

    ReplyDelete